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from the West Wing

New beginings. Aren’t you thankful for new beginnings? A new year is upon us and that always brings to mind new beginnings. This past Sunday at Fairview Church we sang the following song. It spoke to my hear then and continues to do so today. As you read the words, let them sink into your very being; hold on to them when the pain and sorrow threaten to overwhelm or the future seems hopeless. And as you contemplate the words, realize that a new day can not only be the start of a new year, but EACH day is a new day in Christ. Beauty for ashes Joy for my pain You’ve given me wings To fly again Strength for today A dance for my sorrows Because of You Because of You Hope for my future My life’s made brand new Because of You Because of You It’s a new day It’s a new day Shadows rise At the glory of the Son It’s a new day It’s a new day The past has gone And life has just begun Chains of fear turn to freedom Silence breaks into praise It’s a new day (It’s a new day) It’s a new day (It’s a new day) It’s a new new day (It’s a new new day) Since You came my way (Since You came my way) By Tim Michael © 2005 Hillsong Music Publishing (Admin. by Capitol CMG Publishing) Used under CCLI License # 304798 Have a blessed New Beginning! Mrs....

From the West Wing

This week we have been preparing for our school Christmas program. As I sat and listened to the rehearsals each day, I was struck once again on how fortunate our students are to be at Fairview Christian School. First and foremost, at Fairview we have a Christmas program. I don’t know how many of you really realize how unusual that is in today’s world. Many schools do not have any type of program at this time of the year, and if they do, it is called either a holiday concert or a winter concert. But, at Fairview, we have a Christmas concert; one in which Jesus is the reason we celebrate. Second, at Fairview we have outstanding Music and Drama programs. Our students not only learn to sing, but they learn to play instruments as well. This year you will hear xylophones, recorders, and bells. This year the students have learned all the songs and sing together as one choir. It is amazing to me to realize that as they have been learning the songs, they have not sung together until this week. But each class has learned the music and words well and it is wonderful to hear the parts put together so beautifully. It has also been marvelous to watch those with speaking parts stand center stage and speak out clearly. Last, but certainly not least, at Fairview the message of Jesus Christ is proclaimed loud and clear. This year our program does not center on the birth of Jesus. Instead, the students retell an old folk tale about why the long silent church bells rang once...

From the West Wing

The power of a changed life; that’s what Charles Dickens’s “A Christmas Carol” is all about. Most of us have at least heard the story, read the book, seen a movie, or gone to a play production. Here at Fairview, we have put on a production of the story every other year for many years now. Of course, the words “Bah! Humbug!” are always associated with one Ebenezer Scrooge, the title character. As the narrator describes him at the beginning of the story, Scrooge was a tight-fisted, squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old sinner! Not exactly the adjectives any of us would like to be associated with. As the story unfolds, Scrooge is visited by four spirits; the first, the spirit of his dead partner Jacob Marley and the other three representations of Christmas past, present and future. As Scrooge remembers some of the goodness of his younger days, particularly the kindness of Mr. Fezziwig, the master he apprenticed under, he begins to compare how he was treated with how he has treated his own apprentice, Bob Cratchet. The Spirit of Christmas Present continues Scrooge’s “reclamation” by showing him first how Bob Cratchet refuses to speak ill of him and then how his own nephew wishes him well, even when others are not so kind. The Spirit forces him to look squarely at his lonely, miserable life and one can begin to see chinks appearing in the thick armor he has used to protect himself for so many long years. Scrooge finally comes face to face with his own mortality when the Spirit of Christmas Yet to Come...

From the West Wing

One of the things I do here at Fairview is to write the lessons for our Family Chapel program. For those of you who may not be familiar with the program, each year we divide the student body from PreK through grade 8 into multi-age groups. We call these groups “Family Groups” and throughout the year they meet together, get to know one another, and form some wonderful bonds. The main reason for having these groups is to allow our older students to develop some leadership skills by leading a chapel lesson every month. We have found this program to be quite successful. But I digress. As I stated, it has become part of my job to prepare the lesson each month for the leaders to share with their individual groups. I must quickly add here, that most of the time the ideas are NOT original with me, but I glean lessons from a variety of places and put it all together. I am quite excited about this month’s lesson and I would like to share it with you. As part of the lesson, the leaders will be reading the book The Pumpkin Patch Parable, a delightful tale by Liz Curtis Higgs. The story tells of a Farmer who grows pumpkins, outlining the special care He takes to grow His crop. The story concludes with the Farmer picking one special pumpkin. He then washes the pumpkin, takes out all the icky stuff inside, carves a wonderful smiling face and then places a light inside to shine out for all to see. Of course, the analogy is that the Farmer...